wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

Description

Product Description

The chief scientist at the Institute of Noetic Sciences (IONS) turns a critical eye toward such practices as telepathy, clairvoyance, precognition and psychokinesis. Are such powers really possible? Science says yes.

According to noted scientist and bestselling author of The Conscious Universe, Dean Radin, magic is a natural aspect of reality, and each of us can tap into this power with diligent practice.

But wait, aren''t things like ESP and telepathy just wishful thinking and flights of the imagination? Not according to the author, who worked on the US government''s top secret psychic espionage program known as Stargate. Radin has spent the last forty years conducting controlled experiments that demonstrate that thoughts are things, that we can sense others'' emotions and intentions from a distance, that intuition is more powerful than we thought, and that we can tap into the power of intention (think The Secret, only on a more realistic and scientific level). These dormant powers can help us to lead more interesting and fulfilling lives.

Beginning with a brief history of magic over the centuries (what was called magic two thousand years ago is turning out to be scientific fact today), a review of the scientific evidence for magic, a series of simple but effective magical techniques (the key is mental focus, something elite athletes know a lot about), Radin then offers a vision of a scientifically-informed magic and explains why magic will play a key role in frontiers of science.

Review

“A thought-provoking book. The author makes a convincing case for the reality and significance of magic.” —Brian Josephson, Nobel Laureate in Physics and Emeritus Professor of Physics, University of Cambridge

“The modern scientific world is experiencing a radical shift in its understanding of our reality, originating in the deep mystery of quantum physics almost a century ago, and maturing through the refinement of the mind-brain relationship, and of the very nature of consciousness. In Real Magic, Dean Radin, as one of the world’s leading scientific investigators of this exciting frontier, reveals the detailed nature of this world-changing mindscape in an arena that many will find illustrative of the true potential of this new dawn of understanding: the reality of certain forms of “magic,” as we come to a far more powerful manifestation of our free will, and a much deeper knowing of the natural world and of our powers on emerging reality. Highly recommended!" — Eben Alexander M.D., author of Proof of Heaven and co-author of  Living in a Mindful Universe

“Filled with fascinating facts and intriguing ideas, Real Magic places the laboratory findings from parapsychology in the broader context of centuries of magic practices.  This wholly original work then points toward new understandings of reality that can no longer be ignored.” —Jim B. Tucker, M.D., author of the New York Times bestseller Return to Life: Extraordinary Cases of Children Who Remember Past Lives

Real Magic illustrates the limitations of 20th century science and proposes a more comprehensive view that incorporates ideas that have been associated with magic throughout the ages. Blending history, humor, and plausible hypotheses, Dean Radin illustrates that there is a staggering amount of evidence for a broader view of science that offers hope for the future of humanity.” —Jessica Utts, Professor of Statistics, University of California, Irvine and 2016 President of the American Statistical Association

 “Dean Radin writes about all those scientifically and experimentally proven findings that for most people, are beyond imagination, mysterious, or even impossible. This is what Radin calls ‘magic’. Everybody and everything are always interrelated, interacting, and interconnected, beyond time and space. To better understand this challenging new worldview we need a new paradigm in science. Highly recommended.” —Pim van Lommel, cardiologist, author of Consciousness Beyond Life

“Knowing Dean Radin’s scientific work (and appreciating his sense of humor!), I knew I’d like Real Magic, but after the first page I was hooked and read the whole book in a day.  Parapsychologists have too often gotten stuck in abstractions about psychic abilities, but Radin now situates parapsychology where it belongs: it’s about magic.  And magic is about humanness and our spiritual nature, not just spells and love potions. Read, enjoy, learn!”  —Charles T. Tart, Ph.D., Emeritus Professor of Psychology, University of California, Davis; Emeritus Faculty, Institute of Transpersonal Psychology, Palo Alto, CA.

Real Magic will be known as one of the few real paradigm-changing works of science. Radin builds a case, supported by plenty of data as well as by theoretical ideas that are all real and can be studied. Consciousness is the foundation of everything. This is what makes magic so real—it will be the new science. A very delightful book, highly recommended.” —Menas C. Kafatos, co-author of the New York Times bestselling You Are the Universe and Professor of Computational Physics, Chapman University
 
“The real magic of Dean Radin is that he continually insists on a clear eyed, fact based assessment of the accumulating data that ''real magic'' is real. The delightful, easily flowing nature of his text - covering complex histories of magic and high level scientific analyses - is, itself, magical.” —Neil Theise, MD, Professor of Pathology at NYU School of Medicine
 

“Dean Radin shows how even a weighty subject like the nexus of esoteric ideas and modern science can still be an entertaining, easy read. He teaches us here that real magic is not a regression to ancient superstition, but rather an intriguing and surprisingly persuasive anticipation of future science.” —James Fallon, Professor, Psychiatry & Human Behavior School of Medicine, University of California, Irvine
 
“With scientific precision and an expanded model of consciousness based on many years of patient experimentation, Real Magic explores the new frontiers of what passes for "reality" in our modern world of quanta, entanglement and multiple dimensions. Magic is the ancient source of modern science: it reflects humanity''s desire to control its environment and life itself. With clear
thought and welcome humor—a rare commodity in this field—Dean Radin shows that the study of magic is not only a matter of historical curiosity; it also holds an important key to future knowledge of ourselves and the universe our thoughts create." —Jacques Vallee, PhD, computer scientist, venture capitalist
 
Real Magic is a philosophical and scientific milestone. Dean Radin explores the history and foundations of magic, proposing a worldview uniquely appropriate for the challenges of the 21st century. This book is a brilliantly organized bridge that spans the esoteric traditions, magical lore, parapsychology, and contemporary science.” —Stanley Krippner, Professor of Psychology, Saybook University

“We have entered an age when simple artificial neural networks (ANNs), with only a few hundred neurons, outperform humans in more and more tasks, forcing more and more people out of jobs and seriously threatening our future. How can a simple system of a thousand neurons outperform humans with billions of neurons and, as many of us believe from inescapable experience, some kind of real soul? The answer is that NNs are usually designed to  focus. We, too, need to develop our own fullest ability to focus our own minds in order to keep up, to connect with each other better, and to survive and grow as a species. I commend Dean Radin for his efforts in  Real Magic to extract what many esoteric traditions from all over the world have learned through time, to help us train ourselves to focus the full powers of our minds, and for moving us forward (like Freud and Jung) on the long, difficult, but all-important road to bring this line of inquiry into the forefront of science.” —Paul Werbos, PhD, former program director of the National Science Foundation 

"Some scientists are confident that we already know what is and is not possible. But the truth is that science is very much in its infancy. To advance our understanding requires bold excursions into domains some might consider heretical, including esoteric legends about magic that have persisted for thousands of years. This is what Dean Radin sets out to do with Real Magic. In my judgment, it succeeds in blazing new trails. Well worth the read." —Kary Mullis PhD, Nobel Laureate (Chemistry)

“There is a tacit agreement in conventional science to deny, ignore, and remain silent about the most astonishing fact of our lives: the capacity of our consciousness to shape our existence and the so-called physical world. This is the equivalent of blind men refusing the gift of vision. In Real Magic, Dean Radin challenges us to abandon this childish pretense, this taboo, not on the basis of faith but of science itself. Our future likely depends on how we respond to the key messages in Real Magic.” —Larry Dossey, MD, author of One Mind: How Our Individual Mind is Part of a  Greater Consciousness and Why It Matters
 
“Scientists tend to be critical of the scholars who reputedly refused to look through Galileo’s telescope. In Real Magic, Dean Radin lays out impressive evidence that ‘there are more things in Heaven and Earth’ than are dreamed of in 21st century physics. How will this story end? Will 21st century physicists prove to be more like Galileo, or more like his opponents?” —Peter Sturrock, PhD, emeritus professor of physics, Stanford University, and author of Late Night Thoughts About Science

"Radin cleverly frames yesterday''s sorcery as today''s edge science. Must reading for would-be Gandalfs and Circes."  —Nick Herbert, ​PhD, physicist, ​author of Quantum Reality

"The book Real Magic gives a fascinating insight into both the historic and modern perspectives of magical practice.  The modern ‘magic’ that Dean Radin refers to embodies a range of ‘psi’ phenomena whose occurrence is stubbornly statistically significant.  Their magnitude may be modest, but after hundreds of thousands of high quality experiments, instances of remote viewing and precognition for example, are persistent outcomes that cannot be explained away by chance or poor methodology.  From a conventional scientific point of view these are anomalies that do not fit the existing paradigm.  For Dean Radin these phenomena are an inevitable consequence of a universal consciousness that underpins the very fabric of space-time itself.  For most of us the myriad distractions of the everyday world dull our senses, but with concerted effort, yoga and meditation, it seems that gifted individuals might be capable of amazing things.  But as Radin says “Magic is real, but no one said it’s going to be fast or easy.”  —Dr Steve Boreham, University of Cambridge

About the Author

DEAN RADIN, Ph.D., is Chief Scientist at the Institute of Noetic Sciences (IONS) and Distinguished Professor at the California Institute of Integral Studies. For nearly four decades he has been engaged in consciousness research. Before joining the research staff at IONS in 2001, he held appointments at AT&T Bell Laboratories, Princeton University, and several Silicon Valley think tanks, including SRI International, where he worked on a classified program investigating psychic phenomena for the U.S. government.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Chapter 1

Beginning

This book is about magic.

Not the fictional magic of Harry Potter, the feigned magic of Harry Houdini, or the fraudulent magic of con artists. Not blue lightning bolts springing from the fingertips, aerial combat on broomsticks, sleight-of-hand tricks, or any of the other elaborations of artistic license and special effects.

This is about real magic.

Occultists sometimes use the Old English spelling magick to distinguish fictional and stage magic from the real deal. We’ll use the more common term, magic, to avoid unnecessary associations with the occult.

Real magic falls into three categories: mental influence of the physical world, perception of events distant in space or time, and interactions with nonphysical entities. The first type I’ll call force of will; it’s associated with spell-casting and other techniques meant to intentionally influence events or actions. The second is divination; it’s associated with practices such as reading Tarot cards and mirror-gazing. The third is theurgy, from the Greek meaning “god-work”; it involves methods for evoking and communicating with spirits.

Unlike books that discuss beliefs about magic from psychological or historical perspectives, or that list recipes for spell-casting, the goal here is to explore real magic from an evidence-based scientific perspective. Why a scientific approach? You wouldn’t know it by reading most college textbooks, but there’s a vast scientific literature that informs our understanding of real magic. When I was in college, none of my coursework mentioned anything about that literature. But now, after four decades of experimentally studying magic, motivated by scientific curiosity and without a religious background that might have biased me to be overly sympathetic about metaphysical concepts, I’ve come to two conclusions.

First, there’s no doubt that science is the most accurate lens on reality that humanity has developed so far. What we’ve collectively discovered about the nature of Nature over the last three or four centuries, from the quantum to the cosmological, is an awe-inspiring testament to our creativity and imagination. Technologies based on that knowledge provide proof that our discoveries are valid. So, when considering real magic, it would be foolish to just throw away what we’ve already learned.

But second, reality viewed through the lens of science is an exceedingly thin slice of the whole shebang. Science is tightly focused on the objective, measurable, physical world. That focus excludes the one and only thing you can ever know for sure--your consciousness, that inner spark of sentience that you call “me.”

While science as a practice has primarily concentrated on the objective world, scientific methods are extremely powerful, so if we wish we can redirect our lens to look inward and explore what consciousness is capable of. When we do that, we are startled to find whole new realms of knowledge. One of the consequences of taking this inner perspective is that the idea of magic transforms from an impossible fantasy into an aspect of Nature that we can begin to study. From this stance, terms such as paranormal and supernatural are seen as quaint and antediluvian, similar to how modern medicine no longer needs the concept of “bad humors” when discussing the origins of disease.

We’ll explore this new realm of knowledge through two major themes. First, based on a substantial body of experimental evidence, we can state with a high degree of confidence that real magic exists. Second, there are rising trends in science suggesting that what was once called magic is poised to evolve into a new scientific discipline, just as medieval astrology and alchemy evolved into today’s astronomy and chemistry. The new discipline will be the study of the psychophysical nature of reality, that mysterious, interstitial space shimmering between mind and matter. Understanding how this enigmatic space works in a way that’s consistent with the rest of science requires a new worldview--the lens through which we understand reality.

Another theme we’ll discuss is that magic didn’t miraculously disappear with the rise of the scientific worldview. Magic is still intensely present. Prayer is a form of intentional magic, a mental act intended to affect the world in some way. Wearing a sacred symbol is a form of sympathetic magic, a symbolic correspondence said to transcend time and space. Many religious rituals are forms of ancient ceremonial magic. The abundance of popular books on the power of affirmations and positive thinking are all based on age-old magical principles.

From a conventional scientific perspective, these widespread practices are considered examples of infantile magical thinking, fairy tales. Some scientists even use the word magic as a synonym for nonsense, because it implies the scientifically appalling idea that some things “just happen” for no discernible or plausible cause. But magic doesn’t mean “no cause.” It just means that we haven’t yet developed scientifically acceptable theories to explain these effects. As we’ll see, there are already important hints that may lead to such theories, so it’s best to think of real magic not as something impossibly mysterious, but as a forerunner of the future of science.

 

Magic Is Everywhere

The possibility that magic is real can be terribly unsettling to those who’d prefer that it not exist. Consider A. J. Ayer (Sir Alfred Jules Ayer, 1910-1989), a prominent British philosopher who specialized in logical positivism. This is a critical philosophical position that utterly rejects any sort of metaphysical, religious, or magical concepts. As might be expected, Ayer was a hardcore atheist. At age seventy-seven, he died. Fortunately, he was resuscitated, and to everyone’s surprise he reported a near-death experience (NDE). He described it as consisting of repeated attempts to cross a river and “a red light, exceedingly bright, and also very painful . . . responsible for the government of the universe.” Ayer retained his atheism, but declared that the experience had “slightly weakened” his conviction that death “will be the end of me.”1

That Ayer reported this experience is more astounding than it may seem. Lifelong logical positivists are tough. They don’t “slightly weaken” their intellectual positions on anything. The link between magic and Ayer’s NDE is theurgy, the third category of magic. NDEs suggest that there may be forms of disembodied awareness, or spirits. For many who’ve experienced an NDE it’s a virtual certainty that such spirits exist.2 But so far there’s no strictly objective way to tell if that’s the only viable interpretation. We’ll revisit this issue in more detail later.

Another example of magic intruding into the mundane world involves William Friedkin, the director of the movie The Exorcist. Before he made his famous film, Friedkin hadn’t witnessed an exorcism; afterward he decided to do so. He spent time with Father Gabriel Amorth, a Vatican exorcist. His experience with Father Amorth did not overcome his prior agnosticism. But after showing a video of a terrifying exorcism to three prominent neuroscientists and three psychiatrists and not getting the blithe dismissal that he expected from those experts, it “scare[d] the Hades out of him.”3

A third example is provided by historian Michael Shermer, a prominent skeptic of all things paranormal. In Shermer’s September 2016 column in Scientific American, he asked, “Is it possible to measure supernatural or paranormal phenomena?” His answer was an unambiguous no:

Where the known meets the unknown we are tempted to inject paranormal and supernatural forces to explain unsolved mysteries. We must resist the temptation because such efforts can never succeed, not even in principle.4

“Not even in principle” is reminiscent of a quip attributed to Mark Twain: “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you into trouble. It’s what you know for sure that just ain’t so.”5 Shermer justified his confidence by citing Caltech physicist Sean Carroll, because Carroll concluded that the laws of physics “rule out the possibility of true psychic powers.” Why? Because, Shermer continued, “the particles and forces of nature don’t allow us to bend spoons, levitate or read minds.” Furthermore, according to Carroll, we know that there aren’t new particles or forces out there yet to be discovered that would support them. Not simply because we haven’t found them yet, but because we definitely would have found them if they had the right characteristics to give us the requisite powers.6

Sidestepping what history teaches us about going public with such conceits, Shermer nevertheless concluded with certainty that searching for paranormal or supernatural forces “can never succeed.” With that, he slammed the door shut.

So far, this is standard skeptical fare. But the peculiar aspect of this story is that two years prior to slamming the door, Shermer encouraged the exact opposite. In his October 2014 column in Scientific American, he opened with the following surprising admission:

Often I am asked if I have ever encountered something that I could not explain. What my interlocutors have in mind are not bewildering enigmas such as consciousness or U.S. foreign policy but anomalous and mystifying events that suggest the existence of the paranormal or supernatural. My answer is: yes, now I have.7

He went on to describe an event in June 2014, when he was planning to marry his fiancée, Jennifer Graf. Her grandfather was the closest she had to a father figure, but tragically he died when she was sixteen years old. One of the few heirlooms she kept from her grandfather was a 1978 Philips transistor radio. Shermer tried to get it to work. He put in new batteries, looked for loose connections, and tried smacking it on a hard surface. It still wouldn’t work. So he gave up and placed it in the back of a desk drawer in their bedroom. Three months later, Shermer and Graf were married at their home in California. She was feeling sad that her grandfather wasn’t there to give her away. After the wedding ceremony, something strange happened. They heard music. They traced it to the desk drawer in the bedroom. It was the grandfather’s radio, playing a love song.

They were stunned into silence. Finally Graf whispered, “My grandfather is here with us. I’m not alone.” The radio continued to play that evening, fell silent the next day, and never worked again. Shermer’s reaction: “I have to admit, it rocked me back on my heels and shook my skepticism to its core.” As a result, he wrote, still reeling with awe:

[If] we are to take seriously the scientific credo to keep an open mind and remain agnostic when the evidence is indecisive or the riddle unsolved, we should not shut the doors of perception when they may be opened to us to marvel in the mysterious.

What happened between his modest proposal calling for openness in the face of the mysterious and two years later when he slammed the door shut? I can’t speculate about Shermer’s change of heart, but one thing we do know is that when one encounters a belief-shattering event it’s not uncommon to promptly forget about it, or even to deny that it ever happened. Psychologists use the term repression to describe such cases.8 As magician Peter Carroll once put it, “When people are presented with real magical events they somehow manage not to notice. If they are forced to notice something uncontrovertibly magical they may become terrified, nauseated, and ill.”9

Shermer’s experience suggests that real magic is always present, patiently waiting just below the calm surface of the everyday world. Every so often its tentacles brush our leg, causing shivers to shoot up our spine. It’s that electrifying quality that makes magical fiction so captivating, magical stage illusions endlessly entertaining, and magical fraud so easy to perpetrate.

The word magic comes from the Greek word magos, referring to a member of a learned and priestly class, which in turn derives from the Old Persian word magush, meaning to “be able” or “to have power.” In the early nineteenth century, the word magic also took on the connotation of entertainment, delight, or attraction. Magic also implies exotic, alien, or the “other.” This subtext is an important reason why magic is persistently alluring. But that allure often manifests in the sense of watching a train wreck--simultaneously attractive and repulsive. Our magic, which is a core facet of our religious practice, is of course fascinating and perfectly acceptable. But their practices are dangerous, outrageous, and evil.

Incidentally, the word fascinate comes from the Latin fascinatus, meaning “to bewitch or enchant.” The words bewitch and enchant have roughly the same meaning as magic, as do the words charm and glamour. Magic is everywhere.

 

Power

As in ages past, many people interested in real magic today are motivated by a desire to wield power--power to get wealth, fame, love, or sex. All of these applications are possible, and there are plenty of books, videos, websites, and smartphone apps that provide recipes for magical rituals and spells.

Some folks, especially those who subscribe to an orthodox religious faith, may recoil from the idea of spell-casting. Many traditional religions teach that magic and witchcraft are fundamentally demonic and evil. But the way magic is used is completely up to the magician. The power itself, like any fundamental force of the universe, is morally neutral. Atomic fission and fusion are just aspects of the way the physical world works. Questions of morality arise when we use such natural phenomena to create weapons.

Magical power intended to manipulate or exploit others is called black magic. It’s intensely seductive because, as the existentialist philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre once wrote, “Hell is other people.”10 That is, as social creatures, we must depend on others who may or may not be interested in our desires, and that can easily lead to personal conflicts. Use of magic to resolve these conflicts egregiously violates the Golden Rule, so it’s immoral.

 

1. Douthat, R. (December 24, 2016). Varieties of religious experience. New York Times.

2. Alexander, E. (2012). Proof of Heaven: A Neurosurgeon’s Journey into the Afterlife. Simon & Schuster.

3. Douthat, R. (December 24, 2016). Varieties of religious experience. New York Times. Also Friedkin, W. (October 2016). The Devil and Father Amorth: Witnessing “the Vatican Exorcist” at work. Vanity Fair.

4. Shermer, M. (September 1, 2016). Is it possible to measure supernatural or paranormal phenomena? Scientific American.

5. This quote by Twain is doubly instructive. Besides suggesting in Twain’s charming style that “what everyone knows” ain’t necessarily so, there’s no evidence that Twain ever wrote or spoke this quip. See Shephard, A. (2015). “It ain’t what you don’t know that gets you in trouble,” which must be why The Big Short opens with a fake Mark Twain quote. New Republic. newrepublic.com/minutes/126677/it-aint-dont-know-gets-trouble-must-big-short-opens-fake-mark-twain-quote.

6. Shermer, M. (September 1, 2016). Is it possible to measure supernatural or paranormal phenomena? Scientific American.

7. Shermer, M. (October 1, 2014). Anomalous events that can shake one’s skepticism to the core. Scientific American.

8. Loftus, E. F. (1993). The reality of repressed memories. American Psychologist, 48, 518-537.

9. Carroll, P. J. (1987). Liber Null & Psychonaut: An Introduction to Chaos Magic. Red Wheel Weiser. Kindle ed., 162.

10. From Sartre’s 1943 play, No Exit.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Videos

Help others learn more about this product by uploading a video!
Upload video
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.6 out of 54.6 out of 5
968 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Anti Kate
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Kindle Version Missing Diagrams/Charts
Reviewed in the United States on April 23, 2018
This appears to be a fabulous book. I have a quibble, though. Any illustrations, diagrams or charts are missing from the Kindle edition. Chapter Six is half useless because of this. I''m trying for a refund from Amazon, and will apply the funds to a hard copy.
214 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Todd
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
As a student of Philosophy, and a nerd for ...
Reviewed in the United States on April 11, 2018
As a student of Philosophy, and a nerd for religion, the problem of "magic" has always been a fascinating one. Formerly, as a Mormon, I was disturbed to discover that the founder of the Mormon Church (Joseph Smith) possessed numerous magical scrolls, talismans,... See more
As a student of Philosophy, and a nerd for religion, the problem of "magic" has always been a fascinating one. Formerly, as a Mormon, I was disturbed to discover that the founder of the Mormon Church (Joseph Smith) possessed numerous magical scrolls, talismans, seer-stones, etc. I find myself revisiting Mormon scholarship with a completely transformed worldview, thanks to Radin. The distinction between "demonic" and acceptable magic is the result of sociological and polemical pressure, which is what has jettisoned the grimoires of the past into the wastebasket of "occultism." Radin recovers these things, and unveils the secret behind the power of; prayer, meditation, faith, etc-- viz. the same power that is found in so-called magick. I devoured this book in two sittings. A cutting-edge MUST READ book for what shall prove to be an increasingly important field of esoteric study.
191 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Ck
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Anyone can now understand how the Universe works
Reviewed in the United States on April 24, 2018
I finished reading, "Real Magic," yesterday, and I recommend this book to everyone. Dean''s voice is warm, and witty, and he chronicles the history of Magic and its place in our lives and world. We now have Science that explains things that were once thought to be,... See more
I finished reading, "Real Magic," yesterday, and I recommend this book to everyone. Dean''s voice is warm, and witty, and he chronicles the history of Magic and its place in our lives and world. We now have Science that explains things that were once thought to be, ''magical'' and we now have experiments that prove the existence of Consciousness, [C], and its true place on the Hierarchy of Knowledge. We also have our own awareness, consciousness [c], which is our connection to the energetic aspects of our Universe. Through prayer, meditation, and intentional affirmations, we can influence matter, energy, and events in our life. Dean relates interesting tales of experiments he has conducted, and events of personal synchronicity in his life, and his thoroughly researched work has notes that will connect the reader down many paths of inquiry into this most vital area of our lives, that is, Who Are We, and How Can We Improve ? It will still take some time for the old views of who are we to fade away, but you are able to read this book and begin your journey today.
88 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Henry Reed
5.0 out of 5 stars
"Magic is real. Let’s deal with it."
Reviewed in the United States on April 12, 2018
"Magic is real. Let''s deal with it." These are the author''s closing words, not his opening line. Yet here is where the author states what I believe to be the purpose of this book. I have read all of Dean Radin''s earlier books. I''m a devoted fan of the cleverness of... See more
"Magic is real. Let''s deal with it." These are the author''s closing words, not his opening line. Yet here is where the author states what I believe to be the purpose of this book. I have read all of Dean Radin''s earlier books. I''m a devoted fan of the cleverness of his experiments. He makes me want to be a better scientist. Now he makes me want to be a better, more creative inventor. I find this book to be his most creative--and emotional! His writing is noted for its sense of humor, and it appears here. The emotion I''m talking about is not explicit--there are no rants or diatribes. If I had the electronic edition of his book I could easily search for the exclamation mark (!) but I doubt I''d find many. His discourse is calm, the emotion is more implicit in the underlying purpose of the book and the assumptions that motivate it.
First of all, he is dealing with something more akin to an emotional fact than to a rational one. He takes a creative approach in an attempt to right a wrong. It''s like rational emotive therapy for the history of science. It''s like the legal activist demonstrating that the DNA evidence that convicted the prisoner sentenced for life was processed in error and the prisoner is set free. Magic has gotten a bum rap--it''s time to set it free and rehabilitate its image. It''s having a hard time finding a decent job.
What exactly does Radin mean by magic? Not the stage illusions, but real magic, and I will quote him:
"Real magic falls into three categories: mental influence of the physical world, perception of events distance in space or time, and interactions with nonphysical entities."
Sounds like psychic phenomena to me. Exactly! Radin grabs real magic and places it in its rightful context: scientific exploration of the "paranormal." He later proclaims, "Magic can be reframed as the academic study of the full capacities of consciousness in light of the rising interest in informational descriptions of reality." Note that last part... physics is less interested in the physical as the basis of realitiy and more interested in the informational basis of reality, making magic seem more reasonable.
I see his reframing as an emotional rescue operation. Like a therapist explaining how our current irrational behavior stems from a trauma way back that developed its own defense mechanisms, Radin tells us a very interesting story, meant to be healing, about how real, natural magic got demonized, arrested and cast away, only now to be called upon as a needed cure for what ails us today. He tells a fascinating story in a manner you''ll enjoy. I can but sketch out what he does for us by what he shares from history. I enjoyed reading Radin''s account of the long journey of real magic--from the initial, pre-historic taste of the mushroom ages ago to the excitement of The Secret today--as the story of the evolution of esoteric branch science, about to be re-united with its sibling, the exoteric branch we think of as real science.
Primitive humans encounters with entheogens, psychoactive plants and mushrooms, gave rise to the mystery schools. One of the great mystery teachers was Plato, who perhaps first expressed the philosophical concept of magic. In his famous parable of the caves he tells a compelling sertory to suggest that the world is really different from how it appears, that the senses deceive us as to the nature of reality. Here was the beginning of the development of what would later be known as the esoteric view of religion, the "perennial philosophy," proclaiming the underlying unity of mental and physical (inner and outer). That progressive, evolutionary movement encounters two fateful antagonists. The Church denounced estoricism as paganism, and science denounced it as superstitous. Yet even scientific pioneers such as Isaac Newton, and contemporaries, kept their hand (secretly) in esoteric pursuits. At a later date, the Gnostic Gospels would be outed. What would come as a prelude would be Martin Luther''s letter, relativizing the origin of religious truth. The threat of the Inquisition was met by the creation of esoteric social embraces such as the Rosicrucians and the invention of the secret society, the alternative reality, the magical life, punishable by torture and death. Decriminalization was gradual, and that allowed for more public pioneers of the esoteric as Swedenborg and Mesmer, leading up to such celebrity figures of alternative truths as Mary Baker Eddy''s Christian Science, the Fox sisters and Spiritualism, Madame Blavatsky and Theosophy, and then generally into New Thought and the 20th century illuminaries pertaining to the "naturalization of magic": Alister Crowley, Dion Fortune, Rudolf Steiner, George Ivanovich Gurdjieff, Carl Gustav Jung, and Peter Carroll. Mr. Carroll was a British magician who developed the idea of magic as science and the science of magic. It might be noted that (synchronisitically?) the turn of the century also brought the birth of quantum mechanics, the evaporation of the atom-thing into an wavy-energy-dance, and the fickle nature of reality, sensitive to the observer''s viewpoint. In some way, science and magic were finding common ground. And as Radin might exclaim, "Exactly!" And adding another level of affirmation to this co-mingling of domains, the plethora of modern "channelers," from Edgar Cayce to Seth and beyond, generally describe the nature of reality in a manner similar to the emerging consciousness based, informational perspective of modern physics.
What new insight Radin''s fascinating story brings is not only about how the history of magic is an unbroken discovery process. It is also about the extent of the traumatic punishments, condemnations, ridicule, and other forms of torture that befell on folks who continued to profess beliefs or experiences related to the paranormal. It is as if the memory of the suffering of those tortured for heresy, or from the Salem witch trials, haunts the unconscious of the modern person. Even today it is easy to meet someone who feels potentially persecuted for their psychical perspective. It''s a subtle thing, but real. Sometimes it''s not so subtle. Just ask around--the animus against the reality of ESP can be vindictive. The Trumpisms of the Amazing Randi are but the news-baiting tip of the iceberg of denial. Radin doesn''t say it in so many words, but clearly, the form of therapy that he adopts assumes that the culprit, the underlying wound, to be an emotionally devastating affront to one''s sense of oneself. (I remember being told at Princeton that I''d have no tenure future should I pursue my ESP interests. Soon after I left the psychology department, the P.E.A.R. lab was set up in Princeton''s School of Engineering to study psychokinesis.)
Radin brings a rational emotive therapy to these motivated prejudices, warped perceptions and defensive habits of faulty thought as he very carefully rescues real magic from the drama of fake news and proceeds to demonstrate its rigorous scientific foundation. Here Radin can draw upon a generation of labloratory research into things psychical, as well as his own unique demonstrations. In a nod to his previous books, Radin points out areas of research where Psi-magic has definitely proven true and effective (except to committed skeptics). He then goes on to describe some newer lines of research that appear promising. I''ll just mention one of Radin''s unique studies: blessing chocolate has a measurable, beneficial effect upon the experience of the consumer of that chocolate. It''s magic and it''s science. Deal with it.
He echoes Edgar Cayce''s comment that developing psychic ability is like music: most anyone can learn how to play Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star on the piano, but it is the rare individual who has the talent to become a professional musician (Radin was a concert violinist before becoming a professional scientist). In a chapter like I''ve never seen anywhere else, Radin answers the question of "if ESP is real, why can''t I make a million bucks at Las Vegas?" Radin answers that question by postulataing three factors: "reality inertia, lack of talent, and the unconscious." You can read more about that, in an unusual discourse, like I''ve never read before. I might add that some of reality inertia lies in the unconscious, and not everyone is in favor of stuff you want, especially when you are trying to win at zero-sum games, turning someone else into a loser as you win.
Radin would prefer that we develop a science of magic. What is the methodology of scientific magic? It begins with a certain headspace, a state of consciousness that is most reliably developed through meditation. Radin makes a case for "gnosis," or the ability to experience the merger of the personal consciousness with the universal consciousness, the "I am that I am" of non-dual awareness. It is through development of the skills of attention and intention that one can practice magic. The next step is to become comfortable with the realization that the materialistic paradigm, separating mind from matter, is not the only way to imagine reality, so that you can become comfortable thinking within the consciousness paradigm. Radin outlines the elements of the emerging new paradigm to show how much thinking has to change. The next step would be the ethical realization that we are all our relations, there are no "others," and begin to direct our efforts in serving that truth (rather than the "survival of the fittest").
It''s an important book. If I were forced to voice some criticism, it could only be in the context of wishing he had more pages to provide more information. Specifically, it would seem within his creative skills to come up with what Rupert Sheldrake has called, "An experiment that would change the world." What practical application of magic could provide the healing balm to its past suspicious if not offensive odor? How might we heal ourselves of our ambivalence about magic and begin to use it more constructively and via an enlarged and enlightened imagination? In an opening reverie, for example, Radin imagines our being able to shape the weather (as indigenous healer Rolling Thunder claimed he could do). In what may later be interpreted as an unconscious act of precognition, Radin imagines our youth playing fanciful havoc with their psychic ability. Interesting new research indicates that while it was the Boomers who broke the taboo of sharing dreams publically, it seems, according to a recently published survey, to be the Millenials who make a habit of it. The youth of today seem to be developing little patience for the apparent blindness of many grownups to some of the realities coming down the pike, if not already exploding in our school rooms. In my own work with dreams, for example, I''ve explored using "dream telepathy" as an approach to group healing and bonding, as a way to create empathy among people of different backgrounds. I''m sure that Radin, thinking to study the effect of blessing chocolate, will be able to come up with the magic that makes us all active believers.
Like I said, Real Magic is perhaps Dean Radin''s most emotional book, even though short of exclamation marks. It has to do with what he sees as a problem, and his concern to address and hopefully heal it. He wants to end what he calls the "woo woo" factor, so as to free up otherwise resistant talent to develop the science of magic to improve human life. I''ll quote his concluding paragraph:
"Many scientific and scholarly disciplines are slowly coming around to the idea that consciousness is far more important than previously imagined. This shift of opinion, combined with the idea that reality is a form of information, provides a renewed appreciation of ancient esoteric Legends about magic. If we can get past the supernatural connotations, the religious figures in prohibitions, and the occult baggage, then through the scientific study of magic we have the potential to make rapid progress and gaining a better understanding of who and what we are. If we can’t escape or pass, then we may be running headlong into extinction.
Magic is real.
Let’s deal with it."
150 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
excelwrite
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Spot on!
Reviewed in the United States on April 17, 2018
Dean Radin is the real deal. He is a scientist of impeccable credentials and integrity. In this book he speaks the truth about the interplay of consciousness and energy to manifest magic, not Harry Potter or Houdini stuff, but real everyday practical magic. I perform health... See more
Dean Radin is the real deal. He is a scientist of impeccable credentials and integrity. In this book he speaks the truth about the interplay of consciousness and energy to manifest magic, not Harry Potter or Houdini stuff, but real everyday practical magic. I perform health related magic every day as a healer, that''s my job, and I''ve been doing it successfully for 25 years, so I know for a fact that the contents of this book is real and it does work. I''ve helped thousands of people, in part because about 20 years ago at an IONS conference Dean Radin helped me to understand what I was doing and how to do it better.
97 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Joseph M.
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Magic is Real!
Reviewed in the United States on April 22, 2018
Dean Radin''s latest book holds no punches hitting mainstream science squarely in their collective 3rd eye! Although seemingly a subtle qualification, "Real Magic" is the shocking but logical next-step realization for those who have been on the path of investigating... See more
Dean Radin''s latest book holds no punches hitting mainstream science squarely in their collective 3rd eye! Although seemingly a subtle qualification, "Real Magic" is the shocking but logical next-step realization for those who have been on the path of investigating consciousness, the powers of the mind and the irrefutable attainments of trained awareness. Radin reveals the growing wasteland of debunkers and skeptics who find themselves in a statistical straitjacket of no escape, while at the same time connecting the dots across cultures and throughout history establishing the primacy of consciousness in manifesting our reality. I am reminded of Arthur C. Clarke''s principal that "Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic"....The revelation at hand is that this is because.... IT IS MAGIC!
37 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Bohdan Hodiak
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Okay, if you know nothing about this field
Reviewed in the United States on August 5, 2019
I am disappointed in this book. I am in a group of readers that have read books and articles on psi, studied New Thought methods, and have no doubt that ESP exists and that the mind and spirit of some people have produced extraordinary healings and economic and social... See more
I am disappointed in this book. I am in a group of readers that have read books and articles on psi, studied New Thought methods, and have no doubt that ESP exists and that the mind and spirit of some people have produced extraordinary healings and economic and social results. What we want is some insight, some new information on making our intentions more effective. What you get in this book on manifestation, is found in a hundred books. It seems that Dean Radin has no personal story of creating any “magic” in his personal life. That he once rented an office and found out the office next to him was earlier rented by a similar researcher who wanted to meet him, is pretty lame. So is one of his ending chapters on three real life “Merlins.” He has to go back to 1650 to find the first one, to around 1850 for the second, to mid 20th century for the third. If “Merlins” are so rare then it is hopeless. The third Merlin was a rather nasty man, Ted Owens, famous for allegedly having control over the weather.
Radin admits that much of his research deals with abstract topics and produces minor results. Does it matter that a researcher gets a 53 percent result, beating chance by three percentage points? That is what Professor Daryl Bam got testing pre-cognition. Rudin mentions a Slate article that covered this research very thoroughly. But he doesn’t say that the Slate author also wrote of valid criticism of the research methods, making the results inconclusive.
Radin has a historical chapter covering “magic” through the ages. It’s just a catalogue of names. Instead, if you want to get the spirit of New Though, read a very fine classic book by Charles Braden, “Spirits in Rebellion.” Radin also spends many pages bemoaning the academic establishment and its scientism. No doubt he is right but it has always been like that. A Hungarian doctor, Ignaz Emmelweis, working in a hospital in Austria in 1846 proved that if doctors washed and sterilized their hands before poking them into human bodies the hospital death rates would plummet. The doctors were outraged, got him fired, and destroyed his career. Only after they had died offr, did it become standard for doctors to sterilize their l hands. Another example is scurvy, the bane of British seamen on long sea voyages. After it was proved that scurvy could be prevented by citrus fruits , it took the Brithsh Admiralty almost a generation before it ordered that provisions on ships had to contain citrus. That is how English seamen got to be known as limeys.
I understand it is fiendishly difficult and expensive to do useful research in this field. Self-reporting is unreliable; there is a demand for huge numbers of test subjects; and the establishment honchos will not admit they have been teaching assumptions, unproven assumptions, for generations. Then too, the para field is very quirky and messy, something most scientists abhor. Despite my criticism of Radon, he is a pioneer and has my respect. His lifelong research is convincing many people that we are greater than we think and have many untapped abilities.
I would like to see more useful research. For example: would it be possible to prove that people taught a “magical” understanding of agency, can reduce the number of colds they get during a winter? Radin mentions very interesting research his group did on “blessed” chocolate. He says people who ate it, improved their mood. Isn’t this similar to “holy water” and why sports fans are thrilled if they ca own a jersey previously worn by their sports hero?
Okay, so we are babies in this field, taking tentative steps. We’ve been scammed by the law of attraction gurus, the “get rich quick, no sweat” hucksters. But we are dealing with something real. In my own case I suffered an outcropping of spinal stenosis half a year ago. I made the rounds of all the docs: internist, chiropractor, physical therapist and neurologist. I was prescribed pills, a paste and plaster patches to deal with pain. None really helped. I finally woke up. Hey, I believe in spiritual healing, intention, and in a helpful spirit we all have inside us. Didn’t I write a book, published in Ukraine, that had a chapter on New Thought? Let me really, really, practice what I believe, dedicate a lot of time to this. I am retired so this was not hard. Two weeks later, I felt practically normal; no pain, just some soreness. I felt as if something shifted in me. And the relief continued. That’s no proof, I can hear the chairman of the psychology department saying. Yet I spent three months doing all the approved, licensed procedures and it was a waste. Not that I shouldn’t have tried them. I am just glad I had an alternative.
16 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Richard
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great book by a foremost scientist
Reviewed in the United States on April 24, 2018
Step by step, we are getting closer to the long overdue revision of how we think about consciousness. And no one has illuminated more of these steps than Dean Radin. Each article, each book of his has made me wonder, Are we there yet? Is the old materialist model most... See more
Step by step, we are getting closer to the long overdue revision of how we think about consciousness. And no one has illuminated more of these steps than Dean Radin. Each article, each book of his has made me wonder, Are we there yet? Is the old materialist model most scientists cling to ready to crumble yet? Maybe this great book, True Magic, will be the one. It certainly deserves to be. But even if this is merely another masterful, timely contribution to the critical mass that is obviously developing, it deserves to be honored and widely read. It is an enjoyable read as well.
Radin organizes the impressive, empirical evidence that makes necessary a radical revision in the prevailing theories of psychology and physics. What readers may not know is that Radin himself is a acknowledged master of designing and sustaining crucial experiments over a very wide range of topics. His writing is charming, very clear, and persuasive. I have assigned his books in my university courses for over a decade.
18 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Miss Mary L. English
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Find Out About Real Magic, not Hearsay
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 21, 2018
I LOVED this book! So far I''ve read it twice and I might read it another time just for luck (!) If you already know quite a bit about magic (I do, coz I use it in myself) then this book will add extra reasons to like it even more. If you don''t know anything about magic,...See more
I LOVED this book! So far I''ve read it twice and I might read it another time just for luck (!) If you already know quite a bit about magic (I do, coz I use it in myself) then this book will add extra reasons to like it even more. If you don''t know anything about magic, then Dean''s book will give you something very interesting to think about. Mr/Dr Radin is a scientist and professor and has spent the last 40+ years researching human consciousness, mostly the psi (parapsychology) phenomena. The book is written in a light-hearted way in parts and sincere in others and introduces the concept that ''magic'' actually is a thing. He demonstrates the scientific evidence that thoughts are ''things'', that we can sense others’ emotions and intentions from a distance and that intuition is more powerful than we could ever have thought (well, that''s the average person, for sure) He covers the history and origins of magic, the science of magic, the practice of magic and forward into the future of magic. I especially liked the inclusion of this wonderful quote from the Defense Intelligence Agency (US): "The evidence for a valid information transfer anomaly [a euphemism the committee used for remote viewing] meets all recognised statistical and methodological criteria. This means the anomaly cannot be explained by poor experimental design, incorrect protocols, faulty analyses, or fraud. The magnitude of this anomaly is considered to be medium when compared to other known human behaviors." Now, when someone has devoted such a large portion of their life to the subject, then we as the ''general public'' need to pay attention. You''re not going to wire people up to sensors, or research how blessed tea will make you happier, but he has. So, read this book and find out the reality of magic, not the hearsay. Fab:) xx
56 people found this helpful
Report
sb139
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Engaging and clearly written
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 20, 2018
The book Real Magic gives a fascinating insight into both the historic and modern perspectives of magical practice. The modern ‘magic’ that Dean Radin refers to embodies a range of ‘psi’ phenomena whose occurrence is stubbornly statistically significant. Their magnitude may...See more
The book Real Magic gives a fascinating insight into both the historic and modern perspectives of magical practice. The modern ‘magic’ that Dean Radin refers to embodies a range of ‘psi’ phenomena whose occurrence is stubbornly statistically significant. Their magnitude may be modest, but after hundreds of thousands of high quality experiments, instances of remote viewing and precognition for example, are persistent outcomes that cannot be explained away by chance or poor methodology. From a conventional scientific point of view these are anomalies that do not fit the existing paradigm. For Dean Radin these phenomena are an inevitable consequence of a universal consciousness that underpins the very fabric of space-time itself. For most of us the myriad distractions of the everyday world dull our senses, but with concerted effort, yoga and meditation, it seems that gifted individuals might be capable of amazing things. But as Radin says “Magic is real, but no one said it’s going to be fast or easy.”
28 people found this helpful
Report
A. Bennett
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
For everyone who suspects materialism is lacking in its explanation of reality.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on September 3, 2018
A bona fide scientist is skeptical but open-minded, whereas many in the profession today are skeptical, but closed-minded. Dean Radin fits firmly into the former category. Real Magic is a thoroughly engrossing book that proves the existence of a realm of reality strongly...See more
A bona fide scientist is skeptical but open-minded, whereas many in the profession today are skeptical, but closed-minded. Dean Radin fits firmly into the former category. Real Magic is a thoroughly engrossing book that proves the existence of a realm of reality strongly suspected by many through personal experience, but little discussed due to the all-pervading dogma of scientism that currently dominates thought. But, the tide does seem to be turning, thanks to Dr. Radin and a number of others contributing to this courageous vanguard.
21 people found this helpful
Report
Richard Irwin
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The evidence is all there, but some scientists will not look at evidence
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on June 5, 2018
The evidence is all there, but some scientists will not look at evidence if it contradicts their own belief systems. Science Skeptics operate like the Spanish Inquisition when evidence points to a non-physicalist cosmos. "But it moves" as Galileo so succinctly put...See more
The evidence is all there, but some scientists will not look at evidence if it contradicts their own belief systems. Science Skeptics operate like the Spanish Inquisition when evidence points to a non-physicalist cosmos. "But it moves" as Galileo so succinctly put it. Well done Dean Radin.
15 people found this helpful
Report
Grahame Gardner
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Essential reading.
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 30, 2018
I can''t tell you what a breath of fresh air this is, to see a scientist writing about the existence of actual magic, and doing so in a refreshingly clear style to boot. Dean Radin is the ideal person to have written this, and everything is laid out in a no-nonsense easy to...See more
I can''t tell you what a breath of fresh air this is, to see a scientist writing about the existence of actual magic, and doing so in a refreshingly clear style to boot. Dean Radin is the ideal person to have written this, and everything is laid out in a no-nonsense easy to understand style. I''ve been recommending this book to just about everyone since I read it, and I''ve read it twice so far - it''s that good. Buy it immediately!
7 people found this helpful
Report
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale

wholesale Real Magic: Ancient Wisdom, Modern outlet sale Science, online sale and a Guide to the Secret Power of the Universe sale