2021 Star Wars: The new arrival Prequel lowest Trilogy (Episodes I, II & III) sale

2021 Star Wars: The new arrival Prequel lowest Trilogy (Episodes I, II & III) sale

2021 Star Wars: The new arrival Prequel lowest Trilogy (Episodes I, II & III) sale
2021 Star Wars: The new arrival Prequel lowest Trilogy (Episodes I, II & III) sale__right

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Product Description

For the first time in one stunning volume, here is the complete, epic story arc: The Phantom Menace, Attack of the Clones, and Revenge of the Sith. Experience the sweeping tale of good and evil, of myth and magic, of innocence and power–and witness the tragic transformation of Anakin Skywalker from mere slave to one of the greatest, most powerful, and feared villains of the galaxy: Darth Vader.

“The path has been placed before you, Anakin.
The choice to take it must be yours alone.”

On the barren desert world of Tatooine, young Anakin Skywalker toils by day and dreams by night . . . of traveling the stars to worlds he’s only heard of in stories. When Jedi Knight Qui-Gon Jinn and his apprentice, Obi-Wan Kenobi, cross paths with Anakin, it marks the beginning of the drama that will become legend. Courageous to the point of recklessness, Anakin comes of age in a time of great upheaval. The attempted assassination of Senator Padmé Amidala thrusts the Republic close to the edge of disaster–and brings Anakin and Padmé into a secret romance as intense as it is forbidden.

As combat escalates across the galaxy, the stage is set for an explosive endgame. Tormented by unspeakable visions, Anakin edges closer to the brink of a decision with profound ramifications. It remains only for Darth Sidious to strike the final staggering blow against the Republic–and to ordain a fearsome new Sith Lord: Darth Vader.

THE PHANTOM MENACE
by Terry Brooks, based on the story and screenplay by George Lucas

ATTACK OF THE CLONES
by R. A. Salvatore, from a story by George Lucas and a screenplay by George Lucas and Jonathan Hales

REVENGE OF THE SITH
by Matthew Stover, based on the story and screenplay by George Lucas

About the Author

Terry Brooks has thrilled readers for decades with his powers of imagination and storytelling. He is the author of more than thirty books, most of which have been New York Times bestsellers. He lives with his wife, Judine, in the Pacific Northwest.

R. A. Salvatore is a fantasy author best known for The DemonWars Saga, his Forgotten Realms novels, and Vector Prime, the first novel in the Star Wars: The New Jedi Order series. He has sold more than fifteen million copies of his books in the United States alone, and more than twenty of his titles have been New York Times bestsellers. R. A. Salvatore lives with his wife, Diane, in his native state of Massachusetts.

Matthew Stover is perhaps best known for his four Star Wars novels, Star Wars: The New Jedi Order: Traitor; Star Wars: Shatterpoint; Star Wars: Luke Skywalker and the Shadows of Mindor; and the novelization of the movie Star Wars Episode III Revenge of the Sith. He has also written several fantasy novels, including Iron Dawn and Jericho Moon, and four science fiction/fantasy stories featuring a hero named Caine.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

1

Tatooine.

The suns burned down out of a cloudless blue sky, washing the vast desert wastes of the planet in brilliant white light. The resultant glare rose off the flat, sandy surface in a wet shimmer of blistering heat to fill the gaps between the massive cliff faces and solitary outcroppings of the mountains that were the planet’s sole distinguishing feature. Sharply etched, the monoliths stood like sentinels keeping watch in a watery haze.

When the Podracers streaked past, engines roaring with ferocious hunger and relentless drive, the heat and the light seemed to shatter and the mountains themselves to tremble.

Anakin Skywalker leaned into the curve of the raceway that took him past the stone arch marking the entry into Beggar’s Canyon on the first lap of the run, easing the thruster bars forward, giving the engines a little more juice. The wedge-shaped rockets exploded with power, the right a tad harder than the left, banking the Pod in which Anakin sat sharply left to clear the turn. Swiftly, he adjusted the steering to straighten the racer, boosted power further, and shot through the arch. Loose sand whiplashed in the wake of his passing, filling the air with a gritty sheen, whirling and dancing through the heat. He ripped into the canyon, fingers playing across the controls, hands steady on the steering.

It was all so quick, so instantaneous. One mistake, one misjudgment, and he would be out of the race and lucky if he weren’t dead. That was the thrill of it. All that power, all that speed, just at his fingertips, and no margin for error. Two huge turbines dragged a fragile Pod over sandy flats, around jagged-edged mountains, down shadowed draws, and over heart-wrenching drops in a series of twisting, winding curves and jumps at the greatest speed a driver could manage. Control cables ran from the Pod to the engines, and energy binders locked the engines to each other. If any part of the three struck something solid, the whole of the assembly would collapse in a splintering of metal and a fiery wash of rocket fuel. If any part broke free, it was all over.

A grin split Anakin’s young face as he injected a bit more power into the thrusters.

Ahead, the canyon narrowed and the shadows deepened. Anakin bore down on the slit of brightness that opened back onto the flats, keeping low to the ground where passage was widest. If he stayed high, he risked brushing the cliff faces on either side. That had happened to Regga in a race last month, and they were still looking for the pieces.

It would not happen to him.

He shoved the thruster bars forward and exploded through the gap onto the flats, engines screaming.

Sitting in the Pod with his hands on the controls, Anakin could feel the vibration of the engines travel up the control cables and fill him with their music. Wrapped in his rough-made jumpsuit, his racing helmet, his goggles, and his gloves, he was wedged so closely in his seat that he could feel the rush of the wind across the Pod’s skin beneath him. When he raced like this, he was never simply the driver of a Podracer, never just an additional part. Rather, he was at one with the whole, and engines, Pod, and he were bound together in a way he could not entirely explain. Each shimmy, each small throb, each tug and twist of strut and tie were apparent to him, and he could sense at any given moment exactly what was happening throughout the length and breadth of his racer. It spoke to him in its own language, a mix of sounds and feelings, and though it did not use words, he could understand everything it said.

Sometimes, he thought dreamily, he could sense what it would say before it even spoke.

A flash of gleaming orange metal shot past him on his right, and he watched the distinctive split-X of Sebulba’s engines flare out before him, taking away the lead he had seized through an unusually quick start. His brow wrinkled in disgust at himself for his momentary lapse of concentration and his dislike of the other racer. All gangly and crook-legged, Sebulba was as twisted inside as out, a dangerous adversary who won often and took delight in doing so at the expense of others. The Dug had caused more than a dozen crashes of other Podracers in the past year alone, and his eyes glinted with wicked pleasure when he recounted the tales to others on the dusty streets of Mos Espa. Anakin knew Sebulba well—and knew better than to take chances with him.

He rode the thruster bars forward, fed fresh power to the engines, and rocketed ahead.

It didn’t help, he supposed as he watched the distance between them narrow, that he was human or, much worse, that he was the only human ever to drive in the Podraces. The ultimate test of skill and daring on Tatooine and the favorite spectator sport of the citizens of Mos Espa, it was supposed to be beyond the skill and capability of any human. Multiple arms and multihinged joints, stalk eyes, heads that swiveled 180 degrees, and bodies that twisted as if boneless gave advantages to other creatures that humans could not begin to overcome. The most famous racers, the best of a rare breed, were strangely shaped, complexly formed beings with a penchant for taking risks that bordered on insanity.

But Anakin Skywalker, while nothing like these, was so intuitive in his understanding of the skills required by his sport and so comfortable with its demands that his lack of these other attributes seemed to matter not at all. It was a source of some mystery to everyone, and a source of disgust and growing irritation to Sebulba in particular.

Last month, in another race, the wily Dug had tried to run Anakin into a cliff face. He had failed only because Anakin sensed him coming up from behind and underneath, an illegal razor saw extended to sever Anakin’s right Steelton control cable, and Anakin lifted away to safety before the saw could do its damage. His escape cost him the race, but allowed him to keep his life. It was a trade he was still angry at having been forced to make.

The racers whipped through columns of ancient statuary and across the floor of the arena erected on the edge of Mos Espa. They swept under the winner’s arch, past row upon row of seats crammed with spectators cheering them on, past pit droids, repair stations, and the boxes where the Hutts watched in isolated splendor above the commoners. From an overlook in a tower centered on the arch, the two-headed Troig who served as announcer would be shouting out their names and positions to the crowd. Anakin allowed himself a momentary glimpse of blurred figures that were left behind so fast they might have been nothing more than a mirage. His mother, Shmi, would be among them, worrying as she always did. She hated watching him drive in the Podraces, but she couldn’t help herself. She never said so, but he thought she believed that simply by being there she could keep him from coming to harm. It had worked so far. He had crashed twice and failed to finish even once, but after more than half a dozen races he was unharmed. And he liked having her there. It gave him a strange sort of confidence in himself he didn’t like to think about too closely.

Besides, what choice did they have in the matter? He raced because he was good at it, Watto knew he was good at it, and whatever Watto wanted of him he would do. That was the price you paid when you were a slave, and Anakin Skywalker had been a slave all his life.

Arch Canyon rose broad and deep before him, an expanse of rock leading into Jag Crag Gorge, a twisting channel the racers were required to navigate on their way to the high flats beyond. Sebulba was just ahead, rocketing low and tight across the ground, trying to put some distance between Anakin and himself. Behind Anakin, close now, were three other racers spread out against the horizon. A quick glance revealed Mawhonic, Gasgano, and Rimkar trailing in his strange bubble pod. All three were gaining. Anakin started to engage his thrusters, then drew back. They were too close to the gorge. Too much power there, and he would be in trouble. Response time in the channel was compacted down to almost nothing. It was better to wait.

Mawhonic and Gasgano seemed to agree, settling their Pods into place behind his as they approached the split in the rock. But Rimkar was not content to wait and roared past Anakin split seconds before they entered the cleft and disappeared into darkness.

Anakin leveled out his Pod, lifting slightly from the rock-strewn floor of the channel, letting his memory and his instincts take him down the winding cut. When he raced, everything around him slowed down rather than sped up. It was different than you’d expect. Rock and sand and shadows flew past in a wild mix of patterns and shapes, and still he could see so clearly. All the details seemed to jump out at him, as if illuminated by exactly what should make them so difficult to distinguish. He could almost close his eyes and drive, he thought. He was that much in tune with everything around him, that much aware of where he was.

He eased swiftly down the channel, catching glimpses of Rimkar’s engine exhausts as they flashed crimson in the shadows. Far, far overhead, the sky was a brilliant blue streak down the center of the mountain, sending a frail streamer of light into the gap that lost brilliance with every meter it dropped so that by the time it reached Anakin and his fellow racers, it barely cut the dark. Yet Anakin was at peace, lost deep within himself as he drove his Pod, bonded with his engines, given over to the throb and hum of his racer and the soft, velvet dark that folded about.

When they emerged into the light once more, Anakin jammed the thruster bars forward and streaked after Sebulba. Mawhonic and Gasgano were right behind. Ahead, Rimkar had caught Sebulba and was trying to edge past. The lanky Dug lifted his split-X engines slightly to scrape against Rimkar’s Pod. But Rimkar’s rounded shell eased smoothly away, unaffected. Side by side the racers tore across the high flats, headed for Metta Drop. Anakin closed on them, drawing away from Mawhonic and Gasgano. People said what they wanted about Watto—and there was plenty to say that wasn’t good—but he had an eye for Podracers. The big engines jumped obediently as Anakin fed fuel into the thrusters, and in seconds he was drawing alongside Sebulba’s split-X.

They were even when they reached Metta Drop and rocketed over and tumbled straight down.

The trick with drops, as every racer knew, was to gather enough speed going down to gain time over your opponents, but not so much speed that the racer couldn’t pull out of the drop and level out again before it nose-dived into the rocks below. So when Sebulba pulled out early, Anakin was momentarily surprised. Then he felt the backwash of the split-X engines hammer into his Pod. The treacherous Dug had only looked as if he would pull out and instead had lifted away and then deliberately fishtailed atop both Anakin and Rimkar, using his exhaust to slam them against the cliff face.

Rimkar, caught completely by surprise, jammed his thruster bars forward in an automatic response that took him right into the mountain. Metal fragments of Pod and engines careened away from the rock wall in a fiery shower, leaving a long black scar along the ravaged surface.

Anakin might have gone the same way but for his instincts. Almost before he knew what he was doing, at the same instant he felt the backwash of Sebulba’s engines slam into him, he lifted out of his own descent and away from the mountain, almost colliding with a surprised Sebulba, who veered off wildly to save himself. Anakin’s sudden wrenching of his Pod’s steering took him spinning away into the midday, off course and out of control. He pulled back on the steering, eased off on the thrusters, cut the fuel supply to the big engines, and watched the ground rise up to meet him in a rush of sand and reflected light.

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4.7 out of 54.7 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Curtis Hoffmann
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
No longer truly canon, but enriching and informative reads for fans
Reviewed in the United States on November 12, 2020
A paperback collection of what is commonly referred to as the "Prequel Trilogy" or "Skywalker Saga" Episodes I, II, and III, these books were all written with some amount of oversight from Star Wars creator George Lucas, and were at the least informed by his screenplay... See more
A paperback collection of what is commonly referred to as the "Prequel Trilogy" or "Skywalker Saga" Episodes I, II, and III, these books were all written with some amount of oversight from Star Wars creator George Lucas, and were at the least informed by his screenplay material. The product itself is larger than your basic print paperback about the dimensions of a typical hardback, with an Episode III promotional photo on the floppy cover. While in no way a collectors piece, it is ideal for Star Wars completists like myself attempting to glean some added insight into the somewhat maligned trilogy of films.

Star Wars: Episode I ''The Phantom Menace'' by Terry Brooks
The Episode I novelization is very close to the film, with a few additional scenes, none of which have been officially debunked by canon. These additions, most of which concern either Darth Sidious (not officially confirmed as Senator Palpatine, but heavily suggested, much as in the film), and Anakin Skywalker the 9-year-old-slave destined to become Darth Vader. One of the added accounts adapts a deleted scene confirming, via odd coincidence that the bounty hunter Greedo as a childhood nemesis of Skywalker. Much of the heavily criticized dialogue in the film is touched up and expanded, proving a smoother experience for readers. Some of the improved dialogue, even gives clarity to the oft repeated "Now this is Podracing" meme. A relatively quick and painless read, that calls for an immediate rewatch of the movie right after.

Star Wars: Episode II, Attack of the Clones by R.A. Salvatore
Not a bad read, by any means, this novelization is easily the weakest of the Star Wars prequel novelizations. Much like the film it is based on, the narrative bounces from compelling to mundane story beats. Salvatore''s character work is his strength, but his action is hard to read, often seeming like a technical readout of the movie''s story board. The opening of the book is an absolute strength giving added insight to the political context of the episode, as well as a fascinating dive into Anakin''s mother''s time spent with the Lars family. Most of the opening content has not been disproven by any subsequent canon material, and some of the political concepts involving Padme, have actually been upheld by later writings. The major things no longer to date are mid-book scenes adapted from a set of deleted movie scenes recounting Padme''s visit to her family''s home on Naboo. The scenes themselves communicate some appreciated character development for Padme, and mirror nicely with attention spent on the Lars family, but details regarding certain members of her family no longer hold up to continuity. Ultimately all the narrative issues of Anakin and Padme''s frustrating A-plot, coupled with the more interesting B-plot revolving around Obi Wan are here, but it benefits from strong moments of character insight.

Star Wars: Episode III, Revenge of the Sith by Matthew Stover
The best read of the prequels, complements the best film which details the ultimate fall of Anakin Skywalker to the dark side of the force. The biggest issue of it is how much peripheral material has been disproven by later canon. Much of the novelization references an old Clone Wars expanded universe that George Lucas himself de-canonized when he executive produced the hit animated series Star Wars: The Clone Wars. Stover habitually mentions plot points of his own "Star Wars: Legends" Clone Wars novel, Shatterpoint, much of which does not line up with the newer iterations of the saga, and his character insights on Padme and Dooku do not quite gel with the profiles they have since been given. That said, anything not thoroughly disproven by subsequent work act as truly compelling additions to the Star Wars universe, especially Palpatine''s fixation with the Jedi Archives and Mace Windu''s alleged "shatterpoint" force gift: content I hope is upheld in future canon, and not discarded. Additional context is given through adaptations of deleted scenes involving the Senate dissent to Palpatine''s rule, much of which have been supported by current canon reference material. All in all, it is an absolutely engrossing read, and offers a lot to the knowledge and perspective of a true fan.
12 people found this helpful
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Ella
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Can’t put it down!
Reviewed in the United States on April 20, 2020
My son, who is 14 and does not usually want to read, cannot put this book down. He is reading 1-2 hours per day without being asked to. It just goes to show you that if you find the right book for the right person, everyone enjoys to read!
8 people found this helpful
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JumboMoss
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Missing pages
Reviewed in the United States on July 23, 2015
The book is great so far, but there was a critical problem with the printing - pages 477 - 508 are completely missing! Strangely, after page 476 the pages repeat - they start again at page 445 and repeat through to 476. After these repeated pages, the book picks up again at... See more
The book is great so far, but there was a critical problem with the printing - pages 477 - 508 are completely missing! Strangely, after page 476 the pages repeat - they start again at page 445 and repeat through to 476. After these repeated pages, the book picks up again at 509. There''s a crucial bit of the story in that missing section. Of course I know what happens from the movies, but the whole point of reading this book is to fill in some of the details, and flesh out the characters some more and reveal what they are thinking and feeling (which - let''s admit it - the movies don''t do a terrific job at doing). Outside of this pretty bad problem, the stories are fun and well-written.

If the seller sends me a replacement book or a digital copy so that I can read the missing pages, I''ll be happy to revise my review.
55 people found this helpful
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Nina
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Revenge of the Sith is worth it
Reviewed in the United States on January 31, 2020
Firstst and second book of this prequel trilogy were disappointing. Nothing interesting there, just a very bland retelling. If you have seen the movies, there is absolutely no reason to read the books. I read and like both authors in their own right, but it is clear that... See more
Firstst and second book of this prequel trilogy were disappointing. Nothing interesting there, just a very bland retelling. If you have seen the movies, there is absolutely no reason to read the books. I read and like both authors in their own right, but it is clear that they didn''t invest any of their talents to these prequels. The third book, however, is worth reading. Very involved with the story, author offered his own interpretations (that you may agree with it not) that are refreshing and give more than just retelling the movie. It is a good book even for those that didn''t see the movie (if there are anybody out there).
4 people found this helpful
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Kindred Spirits
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Best Star Wars book I''ve ever read....
Reviewed in the United States on June 25, 2016
Books 1 and 2 of the trilogy are great. The 3rd, Revenge of the Sith, is one of the best books I''ve ever read. And I''ve read ALOT of books. Matthew Stover is one of the best writers I''ve come across. His writing is so poetic, beautiful, and very descriptive. This book makes... See more
Books 1 and 2 of the trilogy are great. The 3rd, Revenge of the Sith, is one of the best books I''ve ever read. And I''ve read ALOT of books. Matthew Stover is one of the best writers I''ve come across. His writing is so poetic, beautiful, and very descriptive. This book makes you laugh, hate, love and cry for the tragic love of Anakin and Padmé. I''ve never cried as much as I did in this book. I''ve read another one of Stover''s books and it''s great, but nothing compared to this. I think this is the best book he''s ever written. You see the movie in a whole new perspective after reading this book. You''ll feel pity toward Anakin, even more than you did in the movie. Words cannot describe how beautifully Stover writes. Please buy this. Any Star Wars fan will absolutely love it. Best Star Wars book I''ve ever read. Warning: BRING TISSUES
9 people found this helpful
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RNL
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Immensely better than the films
Reviewed in the United States on April 6, 2016
Like most Star Wars fans, casual or obsessive, I was disappointed by the Prequel Trilogy (Episode I, Episode II, Episode III). The 3 novelizations of those films, tho, are MUCH better. All 3 novelizations provide extra perspective, explanation, and depth. The... See more
Like most Star Wars fans, casual or obsessive, I was disappointed by the Prequel Trilogy (Episode I, Episode II, Episode III). The 3 novelizations of those films, tho, are MUCH better.

All 3 novelizations provide extra perspective, explanation, and depth. The novelization of Episode III (by Matthew Stover) is particularly outstanding, especially for those who were bothered by the apparent plot holes between Episode III and Episode IV.

I now feel that I better understand what George Lucas was going for in the Prequel Trilogy. And I still don''t like it, really, but I respect it more than I used to.
12 people found this helpful
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Anthony Dial
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Definitive Episodes 1, 2 & 3
Reviewed in the United States on May 10, 2019
Very well written, these books make for a much more expansive presentation of the Star Wars prequels. I love the movies but even I can recognize their many problems. The novels smooth out many of those issues and offer a lot of extra scenes and ideas trimmed from the films... See more
Very well written, these books make for a much more expansive presentation of the Star Wars prequels. I love the movies but even I can recognize their many problems. The novels smooth out many of those issues and offer a lot of extra scenes and ideas trimmed from the films to produce, in my opinion, the definitive versions of episodes 1,2 & 3, all in a single beautiful volume.

Revenge of the Sith especially has been re-directed in a way that adds even more depth to Palpatine’s rise and Anakin’s fall. I was a little disappointed that the most meme-worthy lines were cut out (“Hello there!” “I AM the senate!”) but we still have the movies for those.

If you really hate the prequels, these may not change your mind but I think they’re a must-have for Star Wars fans.
4 people found this helpful
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DarkBlade950
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Definitive Way To Experience The Rise and Fall Of Anakin Skywalker
Reviewed in the United States on March 5, 2017
The packaging on this book was good, I remember that the packaging was in a diamond like shape,but the product was in good condition. I read other reviewers claim that some pages are missing paragraphs. When I heard this, I was worried that I would also have missing... See more
The packaging on this book was good, I remember that the packaging was in a diamond like shape,but the product was in good condition. I read other reviewers claim that some pages are missing paragraphs. When I heard this, I was worried that I would also have missing paragraphs but my worries were quelled as not a single paragraph was missing. Asides from the packaging, lets get on to the contents of the novel. The prequel trilogy novelizations are probably the best books I''ve read in a long time, the pacing is steady, the characters are complex, developed, and you genuinely care for each character. The novelizations are better than the films when it comes to presenting the story and especially the characterizations of it''s protagonists and antagonists. My favorite out of the trilogy was Revenge of the Sith, reading that book was like a emotional trip down memory lane. My emotions throughout ROTS wen''t from being happy, excited and amazed to dread, sympathy and depressing. Overall, I absolutely recommend you purchase this trilogy if you are looking for a awesome star wars trilogy to read and or if you were disappointed with the Prequel films and wanted to see how the novels were. With that being said, may the force be with you and have a great day :)
5 people found this helpful
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Top reviews from other countries

Mr Nut Sack
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Perfect
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 30, 2021
The phantom menace book is brilliant, the attack of the clones book is amazing and the revenge of the sith book is perfect. I often found myself putting the phantom menace book on hold as I needed a break from it. It’s pacing was brilliant and everything but there wasn’t...See more
The phantom menace book is brilliant, the attack of the clones book is amazing and the revenge of the sith book is perfect. I often found myself putting the phantom menace book on hold as I needed a break from it. It’s pacing was brilliant and everything but there wasn’t much added to it other than the spacer and tusken raider. The attack of the clones added a lot more and was really enjoyable, Anakin and Padme’s relationship was done to perfection in it with even a few jabs at the poor writing from the film. (I loved the prequels by the way) Where Anakin has a tantrum and Padme makes fun of him acting like a kid. Revenge of the sith is perfect as it adds so much more to the already amazing story. We see it told from Dooku’s perspective, Padme’s, Obi-Wans, Mace Windu’s and obviously Anakins. We also get a glimpse into other little arcs and it also retcons some questions about the film itself.
One person found this helpful
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Chloe
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Perfect
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 22, 2020
Perfect Condition!! Amazing product!! I love it!!!
One person found this helpful
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Mr. R. S. Hutton Mckee
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A tale of the Dark side rising
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on January 12, 2018
Do not underestimate the Dark side and this the tale of the fall of Anican Skywalker. A great story great together and first rate. Brilliant.
3 people found this helpful
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maxine smith
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great book
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on August 26, 2020
Fantastic book my son loved this book
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Matt Manhole
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
It''s a novel based on the Star Wars Prequels
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on October 9, 2018
It''s about what you''d expect
2 people found this helpful
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2021 Star Wars: The new arrival Prequel lowest Trilogy (Episodes I, II & III) sale

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