2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online
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What''s the secret to sales success? If you''re like most business leaders, you''d say it''s fundamentally about relationships-and you''d be wrong. The best salespeople don''t just build relationships with customers. They challenge them.

The need to understand what top-performing reps are doing that their average performing colleagues are not drove Matthew Dixon, Brent Adamson, and their colleagues at Corporate Executive Board to investigate the skills, behaviors, knowledge, and attitudes that matter most for high performance. And what they discovered may be the biggest shock to conventional sales wisdom in decades.

Based on an exhaustive study of thousands of sales reps across multiple industries and geographies, The Challenger Sale argues that classic relationship building is a losing approach, especially when it comes to selling complex, large-scale business-to-business solutions. The authors'' study found that every sales rep in the world falls into one of five distinct profiles, and while all of these types of reps can deliver average sales performance, only one-the Challenger- delivers consistently high performance.

Instead of bludgeoning customers with endless facts and features about their company and products, Challengers approach customers with unique insights about how they can save or make money. They tailor their sales message to the customer''s specific needs and objectives. Rather than acquiescing to the customer''s every demand or objection, they are assertive, pushing back when necessary and taking control of the sale.

The things that make Challengers unique are replicable and teachable to the average sales rep. Once you understand how to identify the Challengers in your organization, you can model their approach and embed it throughout your sales force. The authors explain how almost any average-performing rep, once equipped with the right tools, can successfully reframe customers'' expectations and deliver a distinctive purchase experience that drives higher levels of customer loyalty and, ultimately, greater growth.

Review

“The history of sales has been one of steady progress interrupted by a few real breakthroughs that have changed the whole direction of the pro­fession. These breakthroughs, marked by radical new thinking and dra­matic improvements in sales results, have been rare. . . . Which brings me to The Challenger Sale and the work of the Sales Executive Council. . . . On the face of it, their research has all the initial signs that it may be game-changing. . . . My advice is this: Read it, think about it, implement it. You, and your organization, will be glad you did.”

—Professor Neil Rackham, author of SPIN Selling, from the foreword

“The amazing thing is that the Challenger sales rep has been hiding in plain sight all these years. The Challenger Sale breaks the winning elements of this powerful approach into a set of teachable skills that can take even a top sales team to a new level of results delivery.”

—Dan James, former chief sales officer, DuPont

 

“This is a must-read book for every sales professional. The authors’ groundbreak­ing research explains how the rules for selling have changed—and what to do about it. If you don’t want to be left behind, don’t miss this innovative book that provides the new formula for selling success.”

—Ken Revenaugh, vice president, sales operations, Oakwood Temporary Housing

“Groundbreaking, timely, and disciplined research—presented in a way that is both intuitive and completely actionable—that has already had an impact on our organization by creating a customer lens that enhanced our sales recruiting, hiring, training, and deployment.”

—Jeff Connor, senior vice president and chief growth officer, ARAMARK Global Food, Hospitality and Facility Services

The Challenger Sale shows you how to maintain control of the complex sale. The output of this superbly researched body of work is that you will know how to better differentiate your organization, your offering, and yourself in the mind of the customer.”

—Adrian Norton, vice president, sales, Reckitt Benckiser Pharmaceuticals

“There is a healthy dose of constructive tension throughout this brilliant book. Tension that will bring insight and clarity into how customers buy today and how your sales team must sell. If you are seeking to raise the bar in your sales orga­nization, The Challenger Sale is a must-read.”

—Tom Meek, vice president, sales, Henkel Adhesives Technologies

About the Author

Matthew Dixon is a managing director and Brent Adamson is a senior director with Corporate Executive Board''s Sales Executive Council in Washington, D.C.

About Corporate Executive Board
By identifying and building on the proven best practices of the world''s best companies, Corporate Executive Board (CEB) helps senior executives and their teams drive corporate performance. CEB tools, insights, and analysis empower clients to focus efforts, move quickly, and address emerging and enduring business challenges with confidence.

For more information visit
www.executiveboard.com
www.thechallengersale.com

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4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
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Top reviews from the United States

Dave Kinnear
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Challenging The Challenger Sale
Reviewed in the United States on December 30, 2013
The good news about The Challenger Sale is that Dixon and Adamson further the concept of consultative selling. Even better, in my estimation, is that the authors seemed to use some solid data on which to base their theories. I like some of their approach such as, “Lead to... See more
The good news about The Challenger Sale is that Dixon and Adamson further the concept of consultative selling. Even better, in my estimation, is that the authors seemed to use some solid data on which to base their theories. I like some of their approach such as, “Lead to your solution not with your solution,” and “Differentiate yourself by showing your customer something new about their industry that they didn''t know or provide them with a different view.” I believe the authors also get it right when they state, “In this world of dramatically changing customer buying behavior and rapidly diverging sales talent, your sales approach must evolve or you will be left behind.”

However, they missed an opportunity to move complex sales to the next level. By complex sales, I mean to segregate commodity sales from the intangible products and services that require trust. And by the next level, I mean a salesperson who authentically has the customer’s best interest at heart and not just their own.

The subtitle of this book is “Taking control of the customer conversation.” As though to inoculate themselves from criticism, the authors state that they know some people will interpret this statement as being “arrogant” while stating that it isn''t. They also speak about “educating the customer” and recognize that the same interpretation may be made about that point as well. Indeed, this reader believes that the mindset of a salesperson who takes it upon themselves to control the conversation and educate the customer/client is absolutely being arrogant. The authors seem to give short shrift to the human capacity to sense when they are being talked down to or manipulated. While you may be able to fool some of the people some of the time, most customers will sense when they are being manipulated.

Many consumers today are, for the most part, immune or at least becoming immune to advertising and sales tactics that are focused on achieving the salesperson’s goals. They are skeptical. They listen to their friends and associates and depend on organic search results (not paid results) when researching a purchase. Product, solution and consultative selling (which includes Challenger Sales) are all still focused on gaining the salesperson’s goal of selling a product. Yet, between all the self-serving tactics and training, this book does provide some nuggets of insight for the alert reader.

The authors have defined two categories of sales people, core performers and high performers as well as five major “salesperson profiles”: The Hard Worker, The Challenger, The Relationship Builder, The Lone Wolf and The Reactive Problem Solver. In their research, the authors found that The Challenger was the person who continued to make sales quotas even through tough times like the 2008 recession. “The Challengers are the debaters on the team” and have a deep understanding of the customer’s industry. [Debate: to engage in argument by discussing opposing views.] They took control of the conversation, challenged the customer’s thinking and differentiated themselves by educated the customer on things about their industry/customers that were new to the customer. The Hard Workers are just that, they show up early, stay late and are persistent. The Relationship Builder is an unfortunate profile title. A better profile title would be “The Appeaser.” In this profile, the salesperson believes the relationship is the most important aspect of their job and will do nothing to jeopardize that customer relationship. They appease the customer at any cost – including the cost of losing a sale. The Lone Wolf is the prima donna of the salesforce. They do things their way, AND, they are high performers despite being difficult if not impossible to manage. The Reactive Problem Solver is focused like a laser on solving the customer’s problem. They will sacrifice spending time generating new sales as soon as an existing customer calls with an issue or new problem.

According to the data presented by the authors, The Challengers are by far the best salespeople in terms of results with 39% of that profile in the “High Performer” category. The Lone Wolf (25%), Hard Worker (17%), Problem Solver (12%) and Relationship Builders (7%) profiles follow in order.

A clearer and, in my opinion, better model for the “new” consumer driven market is that outlined by Patrick Lencione in his book Getting Naked and Charles Green in his book, Trust Based Selling. In both of those books, the authors make it clear that the proper mindset for sales is to authentically have the customer’s best interest at heart, not just the salesperson’s best interest. Any model that incites a mindset or intention that is designed to sell rather than to let the consumer buy will eventually be a roadblock to success.

In my opinion, a closer reading of the data and parsing of the survey results will show that the so called Challenger Salesperson is someone who first builds a trusting relationship by demonstrating that they have the customer’s best interest at heart, not just their own, and then help their customer better serve the end customers. They earn the right to share insights rather than simply build credibility from a position authority. They share rather than sell, tell or educate. They listen more rather than debate. They recognize that by representing a specific company with a specific set of products and services that they are already suspected of having a self-serving and highly biased point of view. Anything they say is suspect the same way that paid results in a Google search are suspect. They work hard to gain trust to offset the natural skepticism.

If we take the author’s research and survey results to the logical conclusion and combine that with how consumers are skeptical of large companies and “vested interests,” we would wind up with the best salespeople being independent consultants and manufacturer’s representatives rather than our own direct sales employees. Our products or services would be employed only by the customers who would truly be best served by using them as determined by someone who had nothing to gain by selling one manufacturer or consulting service over another. That is, presumably, how large complex ERP systems are sold – independent consultants and the customer review the large complex software offerings, determine the most suitable fit and the selection is made by the customer with only “arm’s length” influence by the software vendor. We would be forced to recognize that the “new customer” (i.e. the consulting firm) is as knowledgeable as or perhaps even more knowledgeable than we are. We would definitely change our approach to be more based on trust and competency.

Words are important and will establish a mindset in those who are listening. The authors have chosen words that will create aggression rather than assertiveness, being didactic rather than sharing information and focusing on the salesperson rather than on the customer. It is unfortunate since the authors are exactly correct that “In this world of dramatically changing customer buying behavior and rapidly diverging sales talent, your sales approach must evolve or you will be left behind.” Sadly, their prescription will result in more of the same salesperson focused tactics. Ironically, if you want to sell more you have to stop selling. Instead, build trust, demonstrate competence, be dependable and always authentically have your customers best interest at heart, not just your own.
412 people found this helpful
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Emmett
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Boring, whole book belabors a 1 chapter concept
Reviewed in the United States on March 5, 2019
Book is VERY dry and not told in an interesting or engaging manner, whatsover. Almost like a clinical paper. Was so hard to read, I got the audiobook on Audible. Both authors read their own book. It was just as bad, if not worse. Feel like the point of... See more
Book is VERY dry and not told in an interesting or engaging manner, whatsover. Almost like a clinical paper.

Was so hard to read, I got the audiobook on Audible. Both authors read their own book. It was just as bad, if not worse.

Feel like the point of the book could have been made in 1 chapter but it was dragged out into a verbose and nonengaging rambling.
22 people found this helpful
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Harvey
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
like a 200+ page infomercial...
Reviewed in the United States on August 23, 2016
To me, this book read like a sales pitch for CEB(the company that made the book). My company drank the kool-aid and made everyone in sales read this book. They also paid for the 3-day training session from CEB, and ongoing consultation. Personally, I didn''t find much... See more
To me, this book read like a sales pitch for CEB(the company that made the book). My company drank the kool-aid and made everyone in sales read this book. They also paid for the 3-day training session from CEB, and ongoing consultation. Personally, I didn''t find much original material in the book. Most of their "insights" were either common sense or I had already read them in other sales books. I think the book has value for giving a new salesperson a foundation of knowledge in B2B selling, but its real purpose is to get your company to purchase services from CEB.
41 people found this helpful
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Dutchgirl777
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not the Best Sales Book but Had Some Interesting Information
Reviewed in the United States on July 28, 2016
My company made all of the reps buy this book and read it. Then they pushed us to become Challengers. There are obvious take-aways from this book on how to successfully win a sale and create strong bonds with your customers. What I did not like was the idea that you can... See more
My company made all of the reps buy this book and read it. Then they pushed us to become Challengers. There are obvious take-aways from this book on how to successfully win a sale and create strong bonds with your customers. What I did not like was the idea that you can only be successful if you are extremely aggressive and basically tell the customer they are wrong. Successful sales reps are really consultants who don''t talk about their product or service, they talk about the customer''s problem and how they can solve it. They show how they can add value and offer solutions the competition cannot. The book has some interesting points but I am a Lone Wolf/Relationship Builder and have always become #1 at any company I work at. In the industry that I am in, you have to be able to read your customers in order to know when to push back. Sometimes that will blow up in your face.
51 people found this helpful
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J. F. Malcolm
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Strong research and important sales insights
Reviewed in the United States on November 30, 2011
This book comes very highly touted, especially by Neil Rackham himself, who calls it "the most important advance in selling for many years."I personally don''t think it reaches quite that level, but overall it is an excellent book, with provocative insights and useful... See more
This book comes very highly touted, especially by Neil Rackham himself, who calls it "the most important advance in selling for many years."I personally don''t think it reaches quite that level, but overall it is an excellent book, with provocative insights and useful information for salespeople looking for ways to break out of the pack.

The key to a really good book is that it makes you say, "I never thought of that before," and to use that insight to improve your life in some way. Interestingly, that''s also the key to a really good salesperson, as well.

The book is based on extensive research by the Sales Executive Council into the attributes of successful sales professionals. They found that salespeople tend to cluster into five different types, based on their behaviors: Hard Workers, Challengers, Relationship Builders, Lone Wolves, and Reactive Problem Solvers. Research is great when it generates new and unexpected insights, and three are central to the book.

Key insight #1: Salespeople matter--a lot!

One of the surprising insights generated by their research was that the Sales Experience accounted for 53% of the contribution to customer loyalty, more than company and brand impact, product and service delivery, and value-to-price ratio combined! In other words, the latter three are just tickets to be able to play; how you sell is more important than what you sell. In complex solution sales, star performers outperform core performers by 200%, as opposed to 59% in transactional selling, so it''s a critical insight.

If how you sell is so important, the next critical insight is about what the most effective reps out of the 6,000 that they surveyed do differently.

Key insight #2: They don''t care how much you care until they know how much you know

Of the five types, relationship builders are the least effective performers. The old saying, "They don''t care how much you know until they know how much you care," is better said, "they don''t care how much you care until they know how much you know." Relationships are important, but they are the result of successful selling and not the cause (as Rackham says in the Foreword).

In other words, what customers value most today is a rep who teaches them something, who challenges their insights and their view of the world. These reps are the Challengers and they comprise the largest component of top performers. Unlike relationship builders who focus on resolving tension and keeping everyone happy, challengers like to produce constructive tension, because major sales are about creating change and change generally requires discomfort.

The key is not in discovering the customer''s needs and being able to express them, it''s in being able to create the need that they didn''t even have by getting them to look at their world in a way they had not before. As they say, if your customer''s reaction to your pitch is, "That''s exactly what''s keeping me up at night. You really understand our needs", you''ve actually failed. What you want them to say is, "Huh, I never thought of it that way before."

Of course, if you do this and then they go ahead and solve their problem with a cheaper competitor, all you''ve done is sold for someone else. So, the other critical piece is to answer the most important question: "Why should our customers buy from us over all competitors?" This question is surprisingly difficult for reps to answer, as I personally have observed in my own training classes. But, with enough thinking and refining, you can answer the question. The thought process then becomes:

* What are our strengths?
* How do those strengths give the customer the capability to solve a problem or take advantage of an opportunity they don''t know they have?
* What do we need to teach the customer so they will value that capability?

As the book says, "The sweet spot of customer loyalty is outperforming your competitors on those things you''ve taught your customers are important."
In order to achieve this sweet spot, Challengers do three things very well: teach, tailor, and take control. The middle section of the book explains how to build the teaching conversation, tailor your strengths to individual stakeholders, and take control of the sale. The teaching phase is the most expensive part of the book and appropriately enough, by far the most insightful and most innovative. Just this part of the book would make it worthwhile.

Key insight #3: Focus on the core 60%

The final two chapters focus on how to implement the approach in the sales organization. Here their most important insight is that the focus should be on equipping the 60% of the sales force who are core performers to be able to follow the Challenger Selling model. The top 20% won''t need it, and the bottom 20% won''t get it.
The only quibble I have with The Challenger Sale is that many ideas which are relatively well-known already are treated as if they are startling new discoveries. I read some of the passages with the same irritation that Native Americans must feel when told Columbus "discovered" America. For example, they introduce the idea of tailoring your insight to the specific individual needs of the different stakeholders, which all good sales methodologies have incorporated for years. (In fairness, though, so many of these ideas that are common knowledge are still not common practice.)

I would strongly recommend this book to sales executives, sales managers, and most of all, to sales professionals; I challenge you to read it and apply it.
188 people found this helpful
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Amps
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Great seller. The book itself; I’m not a fan.
Reviewed in the United States on December 30, 2019
The seller was great. Timely and accurate with their description. The book itself is not my style. I was forced to purchase this by my employer. Get the audio version, but only if you’re forced to “read” it. By Chapter 3 i realized this is just a Scientology... See more
The seller was great. Timely and accurate with their description.
The book itself is not my style. I was forced to purchase this by my employer.
Get the audio version, but only if you’re forced to “read” it.
By Chapter 3 i realized this is just a Scientology wanna-be book (allegedly, n my opinion). Gives the ‘ this book will help you but only if you buy the program and plan to spend at least 2 years studying it” schpiel. The program is tens thousands of dollars (so I’m told) and apparently the salesperson didn’t use the techniques properly because my employer didn’t buy in.
3 people found this helpful
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M. Schultz
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Only For The Strong Of Heart
Reviewed in the United States on August 21, 2015
I find the premise for the Challenger Sale to be sound but I also believe there will not be too many organizations able to actually get this method of commercial teaching off the ground. It will require everyone to be on the same page within the company and there needs to... See more
I find the premise for the Challenger Sale to be sound but I also believe there will not be too many organizations able to actually get this method of commercial teaching off the ground. It will require everyone to be on the same page within the company and there needs to be an incredible amount of research/soul searching done within that company to find out what those unique offerings/solutions are before it could ever be implemented effectively. It asks an organization to dig deeply into what they can offer their customers that actually DOES set them apart from their competitors, and then to implement that across all areas in the company and require all employees for adopt the profile. I don''t feel there are a lot of companies that could get enough employees all on the same page to be able to effectively use this business model. As the authors suggest, this type of change takes years and I believe most companies could not stay on course long enough. I believe the effort required would be too great and the resistance too great to move people from their comfort zones. Even if replacing staff was part of the program (which I believe it would have to be in those cases where employees refused to adopt the model) odds are it would be too difficult to achieve. That being said, I do believe there are a few incredibly organized and well run companies which are already or could become aligned to the Challenger Sale model, but I also believe any companies which already has or could adopt this model, is already way ahead of their competitors even without implementing commercial teaching methods throughout their company. I would love to work for a company that adopted this style of commercial teaching as I also think it would be a lot of fun to work in this creative environment and you would always know why your customers became your loyal customers.
6 people found this helpful
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Logan
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Bought for colleague, style has changed 100% for better
Reviewed in the United States on January 15, 2021
I’m read this years ago when I was still in sales and loved the concept. I’ve moved into a recruiter role now and support a sales account manager whose style was very relationship based as he came from the hospitality industry. To help him change his view on how to deal... See more
I’m read this years ago when I was still in sales and loved the concept. I’ve moved into a recruiter role now and support a sales account manager whose style was very relationship based as he came from the hospitality industry. To help him change his view on how to deal with selling/up selling people to pay us 5 figure fees vs making sure people are happy after they pay you I bought him this...and I can say after just 2 months his approach and closing numbers have increased drastically for the better. Would definitely recommend this book.
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Top reviews from other countries

Gixersan
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
This Really Is Nothing New And Assumes Much
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 1, 2019
If you have been in sales for more than 3-4 years, especially Field Sales, then this SHOULD really have nothing new to teach you. This book is based on research by people who are analyst''s and never been in sales, and it shows by the assumptions they make based on the data...See more
If you have been in sales for more than 3-4 years, especially Field Sales, then this SHOULD really have nothing new to teach you. This book is based on research by people who are analyst''s and never been in sales, and it shows by the assumptions they make based on the data versus the real world. For me, its fundamental mistake is believing they have the whole spectrum of sales people included in the research. How many of you hitting your number, earning well would take time out of your day to do surveys for these people? Rather strikes me that the follow up novel tries to correct all the flaws in this one, but if you are new they could be worth the read, but remember, there are volumes of theories all backed up with data to prove that their process works, so take the bits that are relevant from all you meet, and then weave your own magic until you find your personal style that works.
8 people found this helpful
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Jules
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
At times it reads a little bit like an academic paper
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on April 29, 2017
Given to me as a present by someone at LinkedIn following a conversation we had about maximizing opportunities and potential, this is an interesting concept and approach, thoroughly researched. At times it reads a little bit like an academic paper, with numerous references...See more
Given to me as a present by someone at LinkedIn following a conversation we had about maximizing opportunities and potential, this is an interesting concept and approach, thoroughly researched. At times it reads a little bit like an academic paper, with numerous references like ‘more of this in chapter X’ or ‘as we discussed in X’, but the message is clear, the identification is well made and the joint authorship flows well. Curiously, for me at least, the book doesn’t follow the challenger sale concept in talking about the potential of the CEB (formerly the Corporate Executive Board), but maybe that is because I have experienced its services first hand and so I already know about the benefits it offers.
2 people found this helpful
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Chris on Amazon
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting concepts, although much of book is spent on ...
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 8, 2017
Interesting concepts, although much of book is spent on selling the methodology to the reader. Lots of detail on their customers using the techniques and how critical it is for everyone to adopt this "new style" of sales. Heavy sales-pitch nature of the book really...See more
Interesting concepts, although much of book is spent on selling the methodology to the reader. Lots of detail on their customers using the techniques and how critical it is for everyone to adopt this "new style" of sales. Heavy sales-pitch nature of the book really comes across on the audio book version. Paper version avoids this and allows you to skim through at a faster pace.
4 people found this helpful
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Kindle Customer
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The Challenger Sale by Tevin GM
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on March 20, 2017
Really interesting book. Really challenging concepts especially to someone like me who has been congratulated over and over because of excellent communication skills. Starting a career in Sales, I am actually looking forward to applying a strategy that seems so unnatural....See more
Really interesting book. Really challenging concepts especially to someone like me who has been congratulated over and over because of excellent communication skills. Starting a career in Sales, I am actually looking forward to applying a strategy that seems so unnatural. The concepts explained in the book make sense, now let''s see how it translate in sales in my reality. Tevin GM
2 people found this helpful
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Paul_O
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Interesting new sales theory
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 4, 2013
Like many, I''ve had all of them; TAS, SPIN, NLP, and all of the other variations on the theme of "how to make gazillions in sales" The thing that intrigued me was the suggestion that we should challenge customers for best results ultimately. For sure relationships,...See more
Like many, I''ve had all of them; TAS, SPIN, NLP, and all of the other variations on the theme of "how to make gazillions in sales" The thing that intrigued me was the suggestion that we should challenge customers for best results ultimately. For sure relationships, etc. are key the premise of this book is that customers will see value in a person/organisation that takes time to understand their business and then challenge the accepted wisdom where appropriate. Whilst still midway though the book, it is an interesting read and I''ll reserve judgement til the end - although so far, so good.
4 people found this helpful
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2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online

2021 new arrival The Challenger popular Sale: Taking Control of the outlet online sale Customer Conversation online